Vitamin B2 – Riboflavin

 Riboflavin is a water-soluble vitamin; it means it is soluble in water. Water-soluble vitamins are carried through the bloodstream, and when it is not required, it is passing out of the body in urine. Vitamin B2 consumption is needed every day because the body can only store small amounts, and supplies go down rapidly.

B2 rich foods

It is present in certain foods, including milk, meat, eggs, nuts, enriched flour, dairy products, broccoli, brewer’s yeast, brussels sprouts, wheat germ, wild rice, mushrooms, soybeans, green leafy vegetables, and whole-grain and enriched cereals and bread. Riboflavin is frequently used in combination with other B vitamins in vitamin B complex products.

Vitamin B2 and Metabolism

Riboflavin helps in the breakdown of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates. It plays an essential role in maintaining the body’s energy supply. Riboflavin helps convert carbohydrates into adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP produces energy as the body requires it. Vital for storing energy in muscles is ATP.

Prevents migraine

Riboflavin acts as a potential treatment for migraine headaches. Changes in the brainstem or Imbalances in brain chemicals cause migraines. Riboflavin helps to overcome these imbalances by improving respiration and energy production within the mitochondria of brain cells.

Prevent cancer

Riboflavin helps prevent cancer. Riboflavin can protect cellular DNA from being damaged by cancer-causing agents like cigarette smoke. It can prevent esophageal cancer and cervical cancer.

Prevents cataracts

Cataracts (a common eye disorder) are a common aging-related condition in which the eye’s lens begins to cloud over. Daily adequate consumption of riboflavin reduces the risk of developing cataracts.

Prevents from Homocysteinemia

Daily intake of Riboflavin supplements lowers homocysteine levels by up to 40% Homocysteine is a common amino acid found in the blood. High levels of homocysteine are associated with an array of adverse medical conditions, including stroke, dementia, heart attacks.

RDA for riboflavin

  • Women 19 and older: 1.1 mg
  • Men 19 and older: 1.3 mg
  • Pregnant women: 1.4 mg
  • Breastfeeding women: 1.6 mg

Creamy sun-dried tomato chicken

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp Olive oil
  • 4 large chicken breasts (whole or cut into strips)
  • 1/4 cup Chicken broth
  • 1 tbsp Arrowroot powder (or 1/4 tsp xanthan gum)
  • 2 cloves Garlic (minced)
  • 1/2 cup Coconut cream
  • 1/2 cup Sun-dried tomatoes (drained if packed in oil)
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil (chopped)
  • Sea salt
  • Black pepper

Method

  • Season chicken breasts on both sides with sea salt and black pepper.
  • Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken breasts and sear on both sides until golden (about 3 minutes on each side). Remove, cover with foil to keep warm, and set aside.
  • Meanwhile, in a small bowl, vigorously whisk the arrowroot powder into the chicken broth. (Sprinkle it evenly on top, then whisk fast – do not just dump it in.)
  • Add the minced garlic to the skillet (add a little more oil if it is dry). Cook for about 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the arrowroot/broth mixture, coconut cream, sun-dried tomatoes, and half of the fresh basil. Increase the heat to bring to a gentle boil, reduce heat and simmer for 2-3 minutes, until the sauce thickens—season with sea salt and black pepper to taste.
  • Add the chicken back to the pan and spoon the sauce over it—Cook for about 1 minute. Top with the remaining fresh basil before serving.

Nutrient profile

  • Calories 295
  • Fat17g
  • Protein29g
  • Carbs      8g
  • Fiber1g
  • Sugar3g
  • Thiamine        15%
  • Riboflavin       25%
  • Niacin             20%
  • Folate             7%

References

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